Killing is making a choice. Choose between one life or the other.

(Source: thedarknightbale, via batmanreblogs)

spacewatching:

An early space station concept drawing. The station was designed as a laboratory to study the physical and behavioral effects of prolonged space flight, and could have possibly been crewed by 50 people. This particular image appeared in the 1959 Space The New Frontier brochure produced by NASA.

spacewatching:

An early space station concept drawing. The station was designed as a laboratory to study the physical and behavioral effects of prolonged space flight, and could have possibly been crewed by 50 people. This particular image appeared in the 1959 Space The New Frontier brochure produced by NASA.

(via caffeinatedneurons)

albabutter:

"One of the most interesting things about Elizabeth Turner was her Kiss of Death. Throughout the trilogy, all of the men she locked lips with has died - including Sao Feng in At World’s End, and (if you want to be petty about it) her father, Weatherby Swann. Usually they would die moments after kissing her for the first time. This excludes Will Turner who has kissed her several times before and beat the odds every time. However, even he succumbed to her kiss and died as well minutes after the two were hastily married by Barbossa.

This is most likely a just coincidence and not something that was intentional, but years later it’s still fun to point out to friends and watch a dawn of realization hit their face when they realize that Pirate Queen Elizabeth may have also been the Grim Reaper.”

Pirate King* Elizabeth

(Source: rouxx, via jon-snow)

(Source: andrewgarfiels, via batmanreblogs)


just—space:

A Laser Strike at the Galactic Center [2000x1816]

just—space:

A Laser Strike at the Galactic Center [2000x1816]

(Source: just--space, via sunsoutimout)

Dance, Dance | Fall Out Boy

(Source: 00sjams, via withfireandblood)

neuromorphogenesis:

Three Planes of Human Brain: Coronal, Sagittal and Horizontal.

From Michigan State University - Brain Biodiversity Bank.

(via caffeinatedneurons)

(Source: kpfun, via spaghettihos)

megasonger:

petecodes:

youeatadvillikeitscandy:

The ever intimidating graphics of the pre 2005 era

his wand is sticking out of his sleeve

megasonger:

petecodes:

youeatadvillikeitscandy:

The ever intimidating graphics of the pre 2005 era

his wand is sticking out of his sleeve

(Source: countdowntoinfinitecrisis, via spaghettihos)

(Source: darrenaronofskyed, via stateofheartpop)

(Source: shawn-ashmore, via stuff-and-thangs)

The cast of The Walking Dead poses for a portrait at the Getty Images Portrait Studio powered by Samsung Galaxy at Comic-Con International 2014 at Hard Rock Hotel San Diego on July 26, 2014 in San Diego, California

(Source: sassy-but-fab, via stuff-and-thangs)

you look at me and you just see another dead girl.

(Source: emergencyprotocol, via sheriffgreene)

nickgetsfit:

The Science of Weight Loss!!!

If you guys are getting sick of these things, let me know. I just think they’re mad interesting…

Retrieved via: Infographic Journal

(via slim-and-svelte)

sciencesoup:

Ratios and Punnett Squares

One way to easily illustrate and predict the patterns of inheritance is using a Punnett square. Usually, we use a capital letter to indicate a dominant allele and a lowercase letter to indicate a recessive allele. For example, Yy would be a pea plant with one dominant yellow allele and one recessive green allele.

If an organism has two identical alleles for a particular gene (like, a pea with two yellow alleles), then they are called homozygous for that gene (i.e. YY). If they have two different alleles, they are called heterozygous for that gene (i.e. Yy). When you cross two organisms that are both homozygous for the same gene, then their offspring will always be homozygous for that gene too. This is called purebreeding, or breeding true.

image

When we cross organisms that are heterozygous for that gene, we get:

image

When we cross organisms that are homozygous but have different alleles like yellow true bred peas and green true bred peas, we get:

image

Let’s say we have a plant that has a yellow phenotype, but we don’t know what its genotype is—since yellow is dominant, it could be YY or Yy. How can we figure it out? We can perform what’s called a test cross: cross is with a plant that is homozygous but only recessive, like yy. The allele contributed by the yellow plant will therefore always determine the appearance of the offspring—and if all the offspring are yellow, we know the original plant had dominant YY alleles.

image

If the offspring are half yellow and half green, we know the original plant had Yy alleles.

image

Further resources: A Beginner’s Guide to Punnett Squares